Friday, March 20, 2015

New Achievement Unlocked!

Yeah, I play too many video games...anywho...Guess what, y'all!! My flash fiction story "Innocent" is in this fabulous edition of Splickety Prime​!!! You can grab an e-version or a print. How cool is that? It's my first story published in a printed magazine :)
Clicky the pikky to get your e-version OR print copy! 


Friday, March 6, 2015

Author Roast & Toast: Mysti Parker celebrates The Roche Hotel



Giving away an audiobook and donuts!



Author Roast & Toast: Mysti Parker celebrates The Roche Hotel: “Umm, are you sure you’ve got the right address, Lyn?” Mary eyes the building the taxi-cab has dropped the hostesses outside of, then swi...

Thursday, March 5, 2015

Chances Are Just $0.99 today!

***Chances Are: Just $0.99 today!***


"I loved both characters dearly. They were truly endearing and encouraging. " -- Paranormal Trance Reviews

"...a heartwarming romance." -- Leona Pence, author of Hemphill Towers

"I'd recommend it to any intelligent reader with a weakness for love." - Georgina Young-Ellis, author of the Time Mistress series 
"Entertaining, delightful." -- Ia Uaro, author of Sydney's Song


Sunday, March 1, 2015

UPDATES!!


For those of you who don't know, I also write children's books, and my first one, Quentin's Problem, is currently on sale for $0.99 on Kindle!! It's all about a pirate boy who can't say "Arrr!" and is perfect for the pre-K to 2nd grade crowd. Grab a copy for your little pirates from now until March 3. 







Congratz to Shamona H who won the handmade necklace from HMC by KATE for our Let's Get Scientifical blog series!






Thanks to all the authors and readers who participated in this series! Without all of you, our blog events wouldn't be possible. Unwritten has always been and will always be for authors and readers to connect through fun events, educational articles, reviews, and more. If you ever want to appear on my blog or if you have any ideas for good series topics, just give me a shout!





Next Event: A-Z Blog Challenge
 April 1-30


Stay tuned for the sign-up link!

For the rest of March, I'm taking the month off to write, write, write! See ya soon! ~Mysti 

Saturday, February 28, 2015

Let's Get Scientifical #21: Love--The Sensible Choice or the Passionate Choice?


Welcome to Unwritten's February blog event! Of course, this is the month of love, so I wanted to celebrate that theme as I've done in year's past. But this year, I've decided to add a scientific spin to it. All month long, talented authors from several genres will write about some aspect of love from their books as it relates to science. It could be social, psychological, biological, or anything in between. Our blog event is sponsored by "HMC by Kate", a fabulous independent jewelry crafter. Kate's giving away one of her very beautiful necklaces that I think fits our theme perfectly. She's also offering everyone who stops in a 10% discount on any item from her Etsy store. Be sure to enter the giveaway at the end of this post and check out her lovely offerings! Without further ado, please welcome our guest author:

Love: The Sensible or Passionate Choice?

by MJ Post

Old MJ says:   In romantic stories, we know who gets picked, right? The true love, the one that makes the heart beat faster, the soul-mate. But is that realistic? Does passion make us pick?

First of all, we don't always want what we think we want.  Writes blogger Pamela Haag:   "a new research study finds that while we think we know what we want, we don’t. Researchers found that when looking at written profiles, participants expressed more interest in candidates who fit their 'ideals.' But in live interaction, the ideals were no longer correlated with romantic interest."

Dating services let customers make sure they only meet people who fit preselected criteria. These criteria tend to be sensible (similar age and education, wealth, preferred look).  But the study implies that when the screening's done and we move on to meeting in person, the sparks don’t fly. Why not?

Psychology Today blogger Dr. Alex Lickerman:   "As with everything else, our conscious minds play second fiddle to our unconscious desires…. [W]e may think we know what we want in a mate, but the real qualities we find attractive—the real reasons for the choice we ultimately make—are often quite different from what we tell ourselves they are."

A marketing expert, Gad Saad, tells us about this. There are different ways that we weigh the characteristics of a person.  If a possible mate is being judged by some combination of looks, personality, and status, then how these get balanced in our minds determines whether someone becomes a mate. You could use what Saad calls the Weighted Additive Rule, in which one criterion is multiplied in importance. After you magnify that trait, someone becomes acceptable who might have been refused if all qualities were weighted equally. This explains  why dumb, good-looking women get smart men -- in such cases, looks are those men's top priority.

Saad also defines other methods of selection, including Lexicographic Rule:   "I'm seeking someone who's good in a particular category, so when I find that quality to the degree I want, the person is a potential mate, period." Want someone rich, hot, or funny -- if person X meets that description, you may fall in love.

Back to the question of whether choices are made because of passion or good sense:   the categories are a little more complicated than two. Good sense usually means pairing with someone of higher status than you,  someone with similar education and background, someone you can get along with. Passion has to do with just feeling someone is right for you so strongly that you will blow past obstacles and objections to be with that person. Based on my life experience, I think choices are made both ways, and the odds for happiness are comparable whether you are passionate or sensible. What matters the most is how maturely you both handle the relationship once you are in it -- but that's a different article!!


****
Bio: MJ Post debuts as a romance author with "Chances Are." Educated in creative writing in Southern universities, MJ has ties to Florida and North Carolina but currently resides in New York City and works in education. MJ is married and grew up in the 1970's and 1980's.
      MJ's interests include relationships, social media, and comic books. Ask her about any and all of them!

Email MJ:   MJPostAuthor@gmail.com

ENTER TO WIN!

This beautiful handmade necklace from HMC by KATE





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Friday, February 27, 2015

Let's Get Scientifical #20: Is Techno-Love Real Love?


Welcome to Unwritten's February blog event! Of course, this is the month of love, so I wanted to celebrate that theme as I've done in year's past. But this year, I've decided to add a scientific spin to it. All month long, talented authors from several genres will write about some aspect of love from their books as it relates to science. It could be social, psychological, biological, or anything in between. Our blog event is sponsored by "HMC by Kate", a fabulous independent jewelry crafter. Kate's giving away one of her very beautiful necklaces that I think fits our theme perfectly. She's also offering everyone who stops in a 10% discount on any item from her Etsy store. Be sure to enter the giveaway at the end of this post and check out her lovely offerings! Without further ado, please welcome our guest author:


Is Techno-Love Real Love?
by Eve Francis

Hi readers! Thank you to Mysti Parker for hosting me on the “Let’s Get Scientifical” blog-hop. My story, released Feb 15 2015, is called Not About Love. It's a lesbian sweet romance story, which deals with an online relationship between two women who meet and fall in love while writing comic book fan fiction. For me, this is a distinctly modern romance, but a not a story everyone is used to seeing yet.

So much of what we know about love, at least from a scientific perspective, has been reduced to chemicals. Mai Nguyen, the main character in the story, is studying to be a pharmacist and her study buddy Nathan reminds her (along with her professors) of this fact. In order to bond with our mates, the body releases happy hormones and chemicals—such as serotonin, dopamine, and oxytocin. These produce the euphoric feelings of love and make us stick around long after the thrill of sex is gone.


There are evolutionary reasons for this, of course. It's assumed that those we have sex with end up being the ones we raise offspring with, and we function better when there are more people to raise that kid. Because of birth control, however, we don't necessarily need to be in love with the people we have sex with anymore. Most contemporary rom-coms reflect the changing way we’re dismantling love from sex (Friends With Benefits is an example), but we seem to have a harder time thinking of love being present without sex. Is it possible to love someone you’ve never had sex with? And more importantly, is it possible to love someone you’ve never even met?

In this story, Mai struggles to decipher whether her love is "real" because it happened online. She and Kate have known one another for a long time, have seen one another over Skype, and have shared many experiences. And since they write fan fiction together, they've discussed sexuality in vivid terms. But does that mean Mai is in love with Kate—the characters they write—or the screen itself? What about Kate's feelings? In fandoms, where emotions already run quite high, it can be hard to decipher if an “I love you” is a genuine expression of romantic intent, a friendly exchange, or just excitement.


Many researchers are already looking into the new ways in which technology influences our love life and if it's possible to be in love through the technology itself. I'm sure they're doing great research, and that attitudes towards love and sex will change in time. But for now, as an author I'm figuring out these conundrums and attempting to write a very short, but I hope also quite sweet story, about the possibilities of love on the internet.

My conclusion? It's definitely possible, chemicals or not. 
Thank you for having me!

Buy link: http://www.jms-books.com/index.php?main_page=product_info&cPath=34_162&products_id=1378
Find more information on my website here: evefrancis.wordpress.com

Bio:

EVE FRANCIS has appeared in The Fieldstone Review, Hyacinth Noir, Plunge Magazine, and Gay Flash Fiction. She has forthcoming publications with Ylva Publishing and JMS Books. She lives in Canada and can be found at http://evefrancis.wordpress.com/

ENTER TO WIN!

This beautiful handmade necklace from HMC by KATE



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Thursday, February 26, 2015

Let's Get Scientifical #19: From Shakespeare to Hallmark-Just Add Chocolate


Welcome to Unwritten's February blog event! Of course, this is the month of love, so I wanted to celebrate that theme as I've done in year's past. But this year, I've decided to add a scientific spin to it. All month long, talented authors from several genres will write about some aspect of love from their books as it relates to science. It could be social, psychological, biological, or anything in between. Our blog event is sponsored by "HMC by Kate", a fabulous independent jewelry crafter. Kate's giving away one of her very beautiful necklaces that I think fits our theme perfectly. She's also offering everyone who stops in a 10% discount on any item from her Etsy store. Be sure to enter the giveaway at the end of this post and check out her lovely offerings! Without further ado, please welcome our guest author:

From Shakespeare To Hallmark: Just Add Chocolate

By Alayna-Renee Vilmont


“If making love is an art
And improper courtship a crime,
The way to a true lover’s heart
Is a mixture of chocolate and rhyme.”

--- Alayna’s Deservedly Unpublished Valentine Collection

It may be a bit simplistic, but Hallmark has stumbled upon something with this observation, continuing traditions that have been around for centuries, and adding chocolate. While many have dubbed Valentine’s Day a Hallmark holiday for this very reason, the roots of using poetry as the ultimate romantic gesture stretch back to at least the Middle Ages. In the time glamourized by the stories of Lancelot and Guenevere, or Isolde and Tristan, knights and ladies were not just busy occupying themselves with liaisons that would be honoured in poetic form years later. A love poem scrawled to the object of one’s affections could be tucked neatly into one’s locket or hidden underneath a suit of armour, and served as a promise of reunification in a world where the average life span barely touched middle age.

If the fastest way to lift a woman’s skirt was to lift her spirits, preferably while sharing a glass or two of them, it was the Elizabethans who took romantic poetry and letters to another level and started a trend that would last roughly 350 years and is still kept alive by greeting card companies. In an era defined by inequality, many peasants still didn’t know how to write well, much less compose verse. Education was often considered wasted on women, yet a background in art, music, literature, and dancing were talents that made upper-class women more attractive and marriageable. Therefore, hastily scribbled verses pining over a lover were not uncommon, and were one of the only discrete and acceptable ways to inform a potential suitor of romantic interest in a society where arranged marriages were law of the land and fidelity a seldom-kept promise in people of any station

Of course, for a young man who could not rely on his looks or station to have women competing to fall into his bed, romantic verse was a tool in the art of seduction that did not discriminate. The idea of becoming a talented man’s muse or a less talented man’s object of flattery was often one not to be sneezed at, and remained that way for centuries---unless you happened to be a pragmatic heroine in a Jane Austen novel.

While many of the poems in fashion throughout Europe during the Elizabethan and Victorian eras were bawdy limericks, or thinly veiled pick-up lines, others were true works of art. More so than any other author, it is the love poems penned by William Shakespeare that live on. Shakespeare’s cranky but insightful Jacques describes the phase of being a lover as “with a woeful ballad made to his mistress’ eyebrow”. While Jacques mocks the convention of bad rhyme as courtship, in 2015, we are still comparing others to a summer day. Words are still sweeter when whispered in secret, in really not-so-secret from a balcony, or in the case of Roxanne and Cyrano, recited by a best friend who is single for a reason.

Did Romeo offer Juliet chocolates in a heart-shaped box while offering immortal words of love? Probably not, but chances are good that if you’ve forgotten a card with a short rhyming verse as a token of your affection, you won’t be getting any luckier than that immortal pair.

**********************************************************

Alayna-Renee Vilmont is a freelance writer, blogger, performer, and modern-day Renaissance woman currently residing in Atlanta, Georgia. This year, she did not receive a Hallmark valentine and penned this blog instead. Her first book, “Ophelia’s Wayward Muse”, is a poetic anthology based around the many facets of human relationships and experiences. Alayna is also the voice behind Jaded Elegance: The Uninhibited Adventures Of A Chic Web Geek, which has been entertaining readers since 2000. She maintains an active presence on Facebook, Goodreads, Twitter, and almost every other form of social media out there. She is a frequent contributor out in the blogosphere, and has a second book in the making---as soon as reality television is discontinued. Alayna has previously appeared on this site, winning last year’s flash fiction contest and contributing other guest blogs. If you’d like to follow the adventures of this modern-day wayward muse, please stop by and visit at www.jadedelegance.net



* Amazon: http://www.amazon.com/Ophelias-Wayward-Muse-Alayna-Renee-Vilmont/dp/1478218886/


ENTER TO WIN!

This beautiful handmade necklace from HMC by KATE

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